Women, work, and family in the antebellum mountain South
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Women, work, and family in the antebellum mountain South by Wilma A. Dunaway

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Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Women -- Appalachian Region, Southern -- Social conditions,
  • Poor women -- Appalachian Region, Southern -- History,
  • Minority women -- Appalachian Region, Southern -- History,
  • Women -- Employment -- Appalachian Region, Southern -- History,
  • Sex role -- Appalachian Region, Southern -- History,
  • Family policy -- Appalachian Region, Southern -- History

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementWilma A. Dunaway.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHQ1438.A55 D85 2008
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17990102M
ISBN 109780521886192
LC Control Number2007023441

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Women, Work, and Family in the Anbellum Mountain South is empirically rich, as one has come to expect from Dunaway. But here the wealth of data, the care of scholarship, and the challenge to traditional thinking are so meticulously combined as to put the reader in the challenging, almost awkward, position of having to rethink all that was known Price: $ Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South Max L. Grivno University of Southern Mississippi, @ Follow this and additional works at: Part of the History Commons Recommended Citation Grivno, M. L. (). Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South. Journal of. Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South Wilma A. Dunaway breaks new ground to examine the race, class, and ethnic differences among antebellum Southern Appalachian women. Most women defied separate spheres of gender conventions to undertake agri-cultural and nonagricultural labors that were essential to family survival. Get this from a library! Women, work, and family in the antebellum mountain South. [Wilma A Dunaway] -- "Wilma A. Dunaway breaks new ground to examine the race, class, and ethnic differences among antebellum Southern Appalachian women. Most women defied separate spheres of gender conventions to.

  Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South. By Wilma A. Dunaway (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, vii plus pp.). Not content with worshipping at the interpretational altars of the "cult of domesticity" and "separate spheres," Dunaway's book explores the ways in which antebellum Appalachian women were not bound by. Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South Wilma A. Dunaway breaks new ground to examine the race, class, and ethnic differences among antebellum Southern Appalachian women. Most women defied separate spheres of gender conventions to undertake agricultural and nonagricultural labors that were essential to family survival or.   By Max L. Grivno, Published on 05/01/ Recommended Citation. Grivno, M. L. (). Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South. Abstract: Book Review. In Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South, Wilma Dunaway fulfills ambitious goals. Foremost, she provides ample evidence to support her assertion that southern Appalachian women were not the uninvolved, two-dimensional, passive segment of the population they have been so long portrayed. She offers a.

  Book Reviews Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South. By Wilma A. Dunaway. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Pp. xiv, ) Wilma Dunaway's Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South offers a much-needed analysis of Appalachian women before the Civil War. Adopting a feminist perspective, she succeeds in both .   In all, Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South is an important addition to Appalachian historiography. To accomplish these goals, Dunaway uses an impressive array of sources. From personal papers and diaries to plantation account books and court records, from church minutes and census records to apprentice records and guardian. Women of the Antebellum period also played a vital role in abolitionism, the anti-slavery movement. Slavery had been a politically sensitive issue, as the South depended on slaves for its agriculture-driven economy, while the industry-driven North saw the threat of the political power that the South could gain if the slavery kept expanding. Skirt Steak: Women Chefs on Standing the Heat and Staying in the Kitchen, San Francisco: Chronicle Books, Dunaway, Wilma. Women, Work, and Family in the Antebellum Mountain South. New York: Cambridge University Press, Elias, Megan, Stir It Up: Home Economics in American Culture, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press,